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Who is Sarah McMullan? BBC journalist, 30, ended up in hospital with sepsis after failing to spot the killer condition

Sarah McMullan

A BBC journalist was hospitalized after failing to recognize her own sepsis just weeks after raising the issue on television.

Sarah McMullan needed emergency treatment and was left’very ill’ after developing the potentially fatal condition.

Miss McMullan, 30, interviewed Kimberley Bradley, a sepsis survivor who was in a coma for eight days after contracting the illness, in September.

Sarah McMullan: BBC journalist, 30, ended up in hospital with sepsis after failing to spot the killer condition

Miss McMullan, from Glasgow, has now revealed that she was affected by the same condition just weeks after conducting the interview.

Re-sharing the clip on social media, she said: ‘A month after doing this interview, I ended up very unwell with sepsis myself.

‘Resulting in an A&E visit, a week in hospital and a couple more weeks of tablets and rest.

‘If you suspect sepsis, don’t hesitate to get help. I should’ve acted sooner.’

She told BBC Radio Scotland’s Drivetime programme: ‘[Miss Bradley] spoke through all of the symptoms and what to look out for and what to remember and when to get help and I did not remember them well enough.’

Sarah McMullan: BBC journalist, 30, ended up in hospital with sepsis after failing to spot the killer condition

Sepsis occurs when the body’s immune system overreacts to an infection and starts damaging tissue and organs.

n the initial interview, broadcast on the BBC Scotland’s The Nine programme, Miss Bradley described the ‘five key’ symptoms of sepsis.

She said: ‘To be honest I hadn’t really heard of sepsis before. I wasn’t aware of the symptoms to look out for.

‘I didn’t know how common it was. I was 39, I was active and actually the healthiest I’ve been and yeah, it really hit me out of the blue.

‘The five key symptoms of sepsis are cold and blotchy skin, confusion, not passing as much urine as possible and uncontrolled shivering.

‘I had quite a lot of those and if you have any of these that are starting to deteriorate then you really need to get urgent medical attention because they are symptoms of sepsis.’

According to the NHS, slurred speech, dizziness and fainting, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea, muscular aches, and a fast heartbeat can all be signs of sepsis.

Without prompt treatment, the condition can cause organ damage and death.

Robbie Coltrane, who died last month at the age of 72, was reportedly suffering from sepsis among other conditions at the time.

Sarah McMullan: BBC journalist, 30, ended up in hospital with sepsis after failing to spot the killer condition

Sepsis Awareness Month was held in September to raise awareness of the main sepsis symptoms and the dangers of the condition.

Colin Graham, chief operating officer of Scottish charity Sepsis Research FEAT: said: ‘We are sorry to hear Sarah developed sepsis just a month after interviewing sepsis survivor and Sepsis Research FEAT supporter Kimberley Bradley.

‘This highlights the importance of sharing sepsis stories to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of this life-threatening condition.

‘We are glad to hear that Sarah got the medical help she needed and we hope that she continues to do well in her recovery.’

source:summarybio.com